The Thirteenth Amendment and Jim Crow Laws

After the Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery in America, racial discrimination became regulated by the so called Jim Crow laws, which mandated strict segregation of the races. Though such laws were instituted shortly after fighting ended in many cases, they only became formalized after the end of Republican-enforced Reconstruction in the 1870s and 80s during a period known as the nadir of American race relations. This legalized segregation lasted up to the mid-1960s, primarily through the deep and extensive power of Southern Democrats. Chief justice Warren needed to convince the other justices that unanimous decision would hold stronger in the public eye. He had to bring the nation together and not make the desegregation issue about the south against the north. This would publicly be a major setback for the nation. Justices court in the Plessey v Ferguson case of 1896 was obsolete. The omission of remedy was a smart decision made by Justice Warren because it falls under an essential rhetorical situation.

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Drug Courts in the United States

Drug courts in The United States have three main goals which are rehabilitating participants, reducing the use of drugs and reducing recidivism. Drug courts and treatment programs are more effective then the incarceration of nonviolent drug offenders. The use of drug courts are effectively fighting the budget problems that US criminal justice system are experiencing due to the cost of treatment programs compared to the cost of incarceration.

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Legal And Ethical Issues Involved In Sentencing Mentally Disordered Offenders

Legal And Ethical Issues Involved In Sentencing Mentally Disordered Offenders. An Evaluation of Current Legislation and Legislative Proposals In Light Of These Concerns
ABSTRACT

This Research Paper provides background on the ethical and legal plight of sentencing mentally disordered offenders and highlights some of the issues which have generated comment or concern. It will study the current legislation on sentencing the legally insane, evaluating both local and international law in an effort to capture the concept behind the legislation. At the end of the paper the aim will be to offer well researched legislative proposals that seek to modify the issues highlighted.

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ASB – Antisocial Behaviour

How effective are ASBO’s in preventing anti – social behaviour amongst the youth in today’s society?

Introduction
This project will focus upon the issues of anti-social behaviour looking at whether they have been successful, what effect Anti – Social Behaviour Orders have had on the community and examines if there is enough happening to deter the youth culture from anti – social and criminal behaviour towards society. ASBO’s were introduced under section one of the government’s Crime and Disorder Act 1998 and it came into force on April 1st 1999. However, since they were introduced there has been a lot of controversy in whether ASBO’s have actually been effective in deterring and punishing criminal behaviour.

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PUNISHMENT: THE EFFECTS OF SOCIETY

I. INTRODUCTION

“You will be punished if you do something wrong.” Without any doubt, we can say that everybody knows the essence of such a message. People refrain from doing what is wrong because of the fear of punishment.

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Children or Adults: An Examination of the Juvenile Justice System

This research paper will discuss whether or not juveniles that commit violent crimes should be tried as an adult. Through research the author will establish an argument that children who commit the crimes of an adult should be punished as an adult. Empirical data detailing the number of juvenile offenders that are housed in adult prisons and jails as well as the number of prisoners serving life sentences that were earned by committing violent crimes before the age of 15 will be included in the manuscript. Finally, I suggest that children who commit crimes that are considered violent enough to even be considered for adult criminal court must in fact be tried in that very venue.

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The Duty of Integrity

The National Association of Legal Secretaries states that members of their association shall maintain a high standard of ethical conduct and shall contribute to the integrity of the association and the legal profession.

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Alternative Dispute Resolution

Alternative Dispute Resolution, referred hereon as ADR, can be defined as a collective description of process or mechanisms that parties can use to resolve disputes rather than bringing a claim through the formal court structure. ADR is part of the civil justice system with the United Kingdom. It is a key aspect of the civil justice system and has grown over the past forty years.

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Bhopal Gas Leak

This case study basically deals with the Bhopal gas leak. The age of mass torts arrived with Bhopal Gas Tragedy unveiling the environmental disasters with toxic invasions, and unfortunately, it continues.

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Categories and Types of Evidence and their use in the courtroom

Criminal law is referred to as that branch of law concerned with crimes committed against the public authority. It is very different from civil law. An example is murder. It is very easy to put murder under civil law because it is a crime committed against another human being but the crime of murder is against the public interests. An example of civil crime is when aperson does not honor a contract.

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