Global Warming: A Hopeless Cause or a Helpless Regret?

According to a survey in Time magazine, 85% of Americans think global warming is happening. The other 15% work for the White House (Leno qtd. Walsh), but Americans should no longer laugh at the current situation. Global warming has been a highly debated and heated controversial topic to which millions speak their minds about. Is global warming real? And if so, who’s to blame? Scientists, government officials, and even religious groups have gone head to head pointing fingers, while in the meantime the problem drastically increases. The world has become ignorant. People would rather point fingers than face the task at hand: Save the planet that has been fostering our species for centuries. The world should not fight over whose to blame for our planet’s demise; rather fight to save the planet from the very real and current threat of global warming.

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Cri-du-chat Syndrome

CRI-DU-CHAT SYNDROME

Cri-Du-Chat means “Cry of the cat” in French. It gets its name from its most characteristic hallmark feature in newborns were they comprise a very distinctive high-pitched, weak, mewing cat like cry during infancy caused by an abnormal development of the larynx that is usually diagnostic for the syndrome. This syndrome has many names to it as the Chromosome 5p- syndrome, Deletion 5p- syndrome, 5p minus syndrome, Cat cry syndrome, and Monosomy 5p but most commonly known as the Cri-Du-Chat Syndrome. Incidences of this disorder vary between 1 in every 20,000 – 50,000 live births worldwide and according to the 5p minus Society, approximately 50 to 60 children are born with cri du chat in the United States each year. Dr. Jerome Lejeune in 1963 described the disorder as a hereditary congenital syndrome linked to a partial deletion of the short arm, or p region in chromosome 5 but in %90 of patients the deletion is sporadic which means it could occur randomly and for it being just hereditary is just not the case.

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Autism and the link to Mercury-containing vaccines

Autism, can it be caused by a mercury-containing vaccine? This is a question that hasn’t been answered very clearly. Therefore, causing parents, of children with autism, to poor their time and money into unproductive pursuits; other parents become afraid to vaccinate their children. So what are the real causes of autism?

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The Coral Reef

The marine organisms which took most interest to me were coral reefs, due to the fact I’m from the east coast and more so island oriented also that I am Haitian/Jamaican. The climate is tropical and the waters are full of coral reefs and vibrant organisms within the water. The perception is that coral reefs are not living organisms and do not really have life. According to Rob Nelson from http://www.thewildclassroom.com/biomes/coralreef.html

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Milk – How Long is the Shelf Life

THE SHELF LIFE OF MILK
Introduction
While there is little controversy over many aspects of product development, food quality issues and safety processes must be taken into consideration. Critical discussion of biotechnology and its application in the food marketplace has resulted in a firestorm of public debate, scientific discussion, and media coverage. The countries most affected by this debate are Middle Eastern and third world countries, who stand to reap the benefits of solving widespread starvation, and countries such as the United States. The world’s population is predicted to double in the next 50 years and ensuring an adequate food supply for this booming population is already a challenge. Scientists must meet the challenge through the production of food products that meet the highest quality issues and follow intense safety processes. Milk is an important food product that is an essential part of a healthy diet, although this product appears to have a relatively short shelf life once the container is opened. This paper will analyze the shelf-life of milk, taking onto consideration the quality issues surrounding safety in the milk-manufacturing process.

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Tarantulas

Tarantulas. Large, hairy, gross and scary are all word that have been used to describe them. Most people think that they are menacing and quick to attack. But truly, unless you are a bug, small rodent or small bird, they are relaxed and non-aggressive arachnids.

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Myths About Embryonic Stem Cell Research

Myth: “Human life begins in the womb, not the Petri dish”
Reality: Actually, it usually begins in the fallopian tube, but it can also begin in a Petri dish.

The testimony of modern science is clear on this point: “At the moment the sperm cell of the human male meets the ovum of the female and the union results in a fertilized ovum (zygote), a new life has begun.”

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Human Biology Experiment

Introduction
The purpose of this Human Biology experiment was to explore the environmental growth throughout the campus of Mount Wachusett Community College. Bacteria were first observed by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek in 1676, using a single-lens microscope of his own design. He called them “animalcules” and published his observation in a series of letters to Royal Society. The name bacterium was introduced much later, by Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg in 1838. (Wikipedia.org)

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Dapple/Piebald Argument

Let me start by saying, the following information is my personal opinion and response to other, unnamed websites. You can take what I have to say at face value. If you do not like it, that is fine, everyone is entitled to their own opinions. If you understand my reasoning, great, if not, that is your choice. I would like to say, don’t believe everything you read on the web. For every one website with logical, clinical, and actual correct information, you can find at least one with incorrect information or information where people try to present their personal opinions as gospel without stating that the information is ONLY their opinion.

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